A Peek Into The Archives – Petite Echo De La Mode

Starting a new feature in the blog this week – a sort of sneak preview of some of the items in the archives – that have yet to come into the light of day.  Or onto the website.

Petite Echo De La Mode was a lovely French fashion magazine that spanned a goodly number of years, all the way up through the 1950’s or early 1960’s I believe.    The archives contain issues dating from 1896 through 1939.  While the Library’s collection is by no means complete, there is a fairly decent selection from most of the years.

If you would like to know more about the history of the magazine AND you can read French – there is a website dedicated to the magazine.

The lovely pictures below come from our April 11, 1926 issue.

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The New York Times Loves The 1920’s!

It seems the 1920’s are in vogue again, and if you’d like to take a peek at what’s happening in the big apple, take a look at this weekend spread from The New York Times

Picture number 12 features the back view of our 1930’s Lounging Pajamas If you’d like to see the front view – visit the link. and check out the lovely photo submitted of the completed garment.

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April 1924 – The Latest Fashions

(Transcribed from McCall’s Fashion Catalogue)

THE OUTLOOK

BY  ANNE  RITTENHOUSE

When the days lengthen and the cold ceases to strengthen, to transpose the old rhyme, it’s time in a woman’s mind to conserve money – to coyly lift it from the housekeeping allowance,possibly – in order to buy the new so that one may throw away the old.  What a glorious gesture is that particular one which woman makes in springtime;  that sweeping gesture which discards all the flotsam and jetsam she has made serve for clothes in the name of thrift.

Now she has a reason, a dire necessity for things new, so she goes to the work quite merrily.  The shop counters are as colorful as an exhibition of cubistic pictures.  Fabrics have lost the influence of Tut’s tomb.  Thank the designers for that much.  But they have not lost the touch of the Orient.  Indian prints, Chinese flowering, Persian and Arabic letterings and patterns are offered.  Roman striping and Venetian blossoms cover silks and cottons.  Whatever is old in art is modern in its application.

Silk fabrics are plentiful for spring clothes and well they should be –  they suit our climate.  Tub silks come to us for simple frock from Paris and Cairo.  Cotton crepe is to be fashioned into frocks for hot days.  Ginghams take their established place for morning gowns.  Dimities with their ancient patterns and some new ones, are to be worn by youth an middle-age.  Pique is struggling for importance in sports skirts and sleeveless jackets.  Silk alpaca is accepted at last.  Nursery flannel, plain, is also striped like cricket blazers in England, is so highly sponsored that none can resist it.  It goes into frocks as simple a monastic robes, and monks are the source of the inspiration.  It goes into tuck-in shirts with rolling collars.

There are three lines to follow in spring clothes.  You should choose the one that suits you best, or take all three.  The first and dominating one is straight with the suppleness of an eel.  The second is wide below the hips and tightly trig above the waist.  The third is flexibly circular, its movement achieved through the cut of the fabric, not the insertion of godets.

New From Our Clients

This lovely version of our pattern # Z2773 in black and white was made for the Art Deco Weekend in Napier New Zealand, the biggest event of it’s kind inthe world (much bigger even than the Great Gatsby picnic held in San Francisco every year)!

This outfit won two first prizes at the event. “Women’s Reproduction Day Wear” and overall “Best in Show”

New From Our Clients

What a surprise to open up the mailbox today and find several new photos of garments made from the VPLL patterns!

Dress # T7357 made in plaid and blue

First this lovely version of pattern # T7357. I have been wanting to make this for myself for ages – and this picture really inspires me to start to work on it.

Skirt # T1047 made in two-tone white and yellow

I’m actually working on a version of skirt # T1047 myself, in a medium weight purple wool. I hadn’t thought of making it actually in a two-tone color scheme. Below is another picture of the same skirt in a different color arrangement.

Skirt # T1047 made in two-tone plaid and blue

Then there are hats! I never get tired of seeing what someone else does to personalize, and add their own creative touches to a pattern. The two photos below are from pattern # HW001.

Hat from # HW001 - front view

Hat from # HW001 - side view

HOT OFF THE PRESSES!

Two new patterns in the works right now – both at various stages of completion.

First up a 1940’s Bathing Suit/Play Suit.  Even though I know it’s much too cold for this perky little outfit now – it will make a delightful addition to the wardrobe come summer.

F9046_34b_swimwear_webbg

This is a lovely pattern from the mid-194o’s, the double tie in front for the halter top is a nice, distinctive touch.

STATUS:

Digitizing is completed.  Graphics scanned.  Currently typing and editing text for the instructions.

ESTIMATED RELEASE DATE:

November 20, 2009.

After migrating most of the inventory to our new site provider, it became clear that there were a lot of categories that we had few or no patterns in.  Imagine my surprise when I saw that we had not a single 1920’s skirt pattern available!

This pattern seems to catch the classic 1920’s styling perfectly.  And it features three options for the skirt panel insert.  A plain straight panel, a pleated panel, and a gathered draped panel.  The addition of the attached camisole to keep everything in place is found on quite a few of the 1920’s (and some of the 1930’s) patterns in the archive.

COVER_small_web

STATUS:

4 of 8 pieces digitized and proofed.  Remaining pieces to be digitized, graphics to be scanned.

ESTIMATED RELEASE DATE:

November 28, 2009