April 1924 – The Latest Fashions

(Transcribed from McCall’s Fashion Catalogue)

THE OUTLOOK

BY  ANNE  RITTENHOUSE

When the days lengthen and the cold ceases to strengthen, to transpose the old rhyme, it’s time in a woman’s mind to conserve money – to coyly lift it from the housekeeping allowance,possibly – in order to buy the new so that one may throw away the old.  What a glorious gesture is that particular one which woman makes in springtime;  that sweeping gesture which discards all the flotsam and jetsam she has made serve for clothes in the name of thrift.

Now she has a reason, a dire necessity for things new, so she goes to the work quite merrily.  The shop counters are as colorful as an exhibition of cubistic pictures.  Fabrics have lost the influence of Tut’s tomb.  Thank the designers for that much.  But they have not lost the touch of the Orient.  Indian prints, Chinese flowering, Persian and Arabic letterings and patterns are offered.  Roman striping and Venetian blossoms cover silks and cottons.  Whatever is old in art is modern in its application.

Silk fabrics are plentiful for spring clothes and well they should be –  they suit our climate.  Tub silks come to us for simple frock from Paris and Cairo.  Cotton crepe is to be fashioned into frocks for hot days.  Ginghams take their established place for morning gowns.  Dimities with their ancient patterns and some new ones, are to be worn by youth an middle-age.  Pique is struggling for importance in sports skirts and sleeveless jackets.  Silk alpaca is accepted at last.  Nursery flannel, plain, is also striped like cricket blazers in England, is so highly sponsored that none can resist it.  It goes into frocks as simple a monastic robes, and monks are the source of the inspiration.  It goes into tuck-in shirts with rolling collars.

There are three lines to follow in spring clothes.  You should choose the one that suits you best, or take all three.  The first and dominating one is straight with the suppleness of an eel.  The second is wide below the hips and tightly trig above the waist.  The third is flexibly circular, its movement achieved through the cut of the fabric, not the insertion of godets.

Advertisements

1924 Spring – Women’s Fashions

Characteristics Of The Spring Styles

Spring fashion dictates a silhouette that is narrow and flat, with all curves eliminated as much as possible. Bust, waist and hips are diminished at every point from the shingled head under a tiny cloche hat to the hem of a short and narrow skirt.

Waistlines are conspicuously absent, while the hip line is often indicated by the narrow belt or a gathered girdle, or an ornament, but is quite often eliminated altogether in straight dresses.

Tube or pencil dresses and coats, the coats in full or three-quarter length. There is a tendency toward cape backs in dresses of all types, street, afternoon and evening, because of its straightening effect on the figure, especially when it is at all full in back.

The use of flounces, draperies tiers, accordion pleats, panels, etc. for afternoon and evening dress. The popularity of accordion pleats in flounces, cape backs, and the lower parts of sleeves can not be stressed enough, and is most chic for springtime garments.

The current vogue for two-piece dresses with straight blouses, and exquisite lingerie collars and cuffs, slit pockets, and narrow belts continues unabated.

The skirt length is now short, even in afternoon frocks, and still shorter for street and sports clothes. For evening wear the length various from ankle-length to from six to ten inches above the floor.

Stockings should be as sheer as possible, with either plain or with the drop-stitch clock at the side, in rose, beige, nude, banana, log cabin, Sahara, acorn or peach. The same type of stocking worn at morning (except for sports), noon and night. For evening, even with silver and gold evening slippers, the nude or peach shade is most correct for the newest fashions.